Museum (Big) Data Mining in Qatar: researching and developing methods, techniques, and a policy

Demonstration
Georgios Papaioannou, UCL Qatar, Qatar

This demonstration presents a new project on museum Big Data and data mining using data related to museums in Qatar as a case study. In Qatar museums, as elsewhere in the world, there is an emerging need to detect new and discover hidden and useful information, patterns, clusters and relationships among large sums of museum-related data. Addressing this need requires ethical considerations and processes, a thorough understanding of contexts in the real and the digital world, and cross-disciplinary Big Data methods, techniques and testing, all of which fall within this new project’s objectives and discussion points demonstrated here for the first time.
The aims of this Research Project at University College London in Qatar are to
• contribute to the development of Big Data and Data Mining methods and techniques on museum datasets,
• produce a policy document on Big Data and the museums in Qatar,
• initiate at University College London in Qatar a research team on Museum / Cultural Heritage Big Data,
• explore links / collaborations to information seeking research schemes related to Social Media cultural dataset-producing processes in Qatar.

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