The Cartography project: an online platform for the relational documentation of participatory art practices in museums and art galleries

Demonstration
Rebecca Sinker, Tate Galleries, UK, Gabriella Giannachi, University of Exeter, UK, Steve Benford, University of Nottingham, UK

This paper presents the initial findings from the prototype iterative development of the Cartography Project. This is a novel digital platform for the relational documentation of participatory art practices in museums and art galleries. Iteratively developed with practitioners from the field of participatory arts, along with participants, by the Tate Britain and Tate Liverpool and computer science and performance and new media researchers at the Universities of Nottingham and Exeter, UK. The pilot Cartography project offered a range of viewpoints through which a participatory work can be seen for all its complexity and raised questions about museum conventions for collecting, contextualising and presenting cultural artefacts and practices, both in the museum and online.

Bibliography:
ArtMaps, http://artmaps.tate.org.uk/artmaps/tate/, verified 30/9/2017.
Bishop, C. (2012) Artificial Hells: Participatory Art and the Politics of Spectatorship, London and New York: Verso.
Bourriaud, N. (2002) Relational Aesthetics, Translated by Simon Pleasance and Fronza Woods with the participation of Mathieu Copel, Paris: Les Presses du Réel.
Byrd-Phillips, L. (2013) ‘The Temple and the Bazaar: Wikipedia as a Platform for Open Authority in Museums’, Curator: The Museum Journal 56, no. 2: 219–235.
Historypin, https://www.historypin.org/en/, verified 30/9/2017.
Malde, S. (2017), https://medium.com/@SejulM/museums-doing-digital-and-museums-doing-good-can-we-forge-a-connection-be45ab5b67ab verified 28/9/17.
Sandell, R. (2000) ‘Museums as Agents of Social Change’, Museum Management and Curatorship, 17: 4, 401-418.
Simon, N. (2010) The Participatory Museum, http://www.participatorymuseum.org, verified 1/7/2017.